Solar Settlers: Card Placement

Okay! Who’s ready to learn about how cards are played in Solar Settlers?

So on the most basic level, each card has a type of space it can be played on (indicated in your hand just below the name of the card). So in this example, the Mining Colony must be built on a rock world and the Hunting Colony must be built on a Jungle World.

Fortunately, in this circumstance we have discovered a nearby jungle world ready to go, so we’re able to play our Hunting Colony right away, which is nice because it gives us a habitat for our colonists to live in (victory in Solar Settlers comes by “retiring” a certain number of colonists into suitable habitats!

If we wanted to play some of our other cards from our hand, we would need to explore more of the nearby sectors, which I’ll go into more detail about in another blog post, so stay tuned for that.

In other news, the Solar Settlers Greenlight is off to the best start of any Greenlight campaign BrainGoodGames has had so far. We’re very close to passing Minos Strategos’ vote total, so if you haven’t already, go vote and you could be the one to push us over the top! Thanks so much for all your continued support!

WE’RE LIVE ON GREENLIGHT AGAIN!

And we could really use your help by voting here!

http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=918918282

Launch trailer below. Thank you all so much for your support!!

Solar Settlers is a card-driven space exploration strategy game set in the far future. Our sun is on the verge of collapse and so mankind has taken to the stars aboard colony ships to seek out a new home. You are the caretaker of one such ship, and must carefully manage the planets you find, technology cards you posses and fellow colonists as they gradually awaken from a long cryo-sleep in order to scratch out a new cradle for humanity.

GeekNights Food Chain Magnate Design Analysis

Some very interesting discussion of the board game Food Chain Magnate by the GeekNight guys. I’ve seen these guys floating around doing GDC talks and a couple other places, but this is some particularly insightful commentary. Check it out!

Some game design talk about “big stuff never used”, “attractors”, heuristic tress, the learning process for games, and abstractly the information horizon!

Alakaram!

In case you didn’t know, I’m a HUGE fan of Auro: A Monster-Bumping Adventure (Steam link). When you get right down to it, this game had a HUGE influence on my game design thinking, especially with respect to the kinds of pared-down, endlessly interesting little decision-making machines that I want to keep making! Auro, and Keith Burgun’s writing about a single-player ladder ladder/procedural content system (among lots of other interesting game-design insights!) have become the basis for BrainGoodGames!

Long story short, Auro is awesome, Dinofarm is awesome, Keith Burgun is awesome, and I’m super excited to follow and play their spiritual successor to Auro Alakaram! Of particular interest is this idea of “Chaff” spells, which may or may not be balanced, but are included for the sake of variety for players who favor that (or sometimes do) over serious, meticulously balanced play. I think there’s probably a ton of room for spells like this and I can’t wait to try em out!

Awesome!

Game Design Blogs!

There’s been an awesome resurgence on the Dinofarm discord of people blogging about game design! Tons to think about and great to have a community of people to bounce ideas off of. 

You can check out a list that Redless made on the Dinofarm forums here!

http://www.dinofarmgames.com/forum/index.php?threads/game-design-projects.2650